DR. NATH E-NEWSLETTER


OCTOBER 2017



The Importance of Biceps Length for Good Shoulder Function

REACHING TO THE SIDE


LEFT: Without Elbow Extension Splint



RIGHT: With Elbow Extension Splint

REACHING UP


LEFT: Without Elbow Extension Splint



RIGHT: With elbow Extension Splint

Children with obstetric brachial plexus injuries often develop shortened biceps tendons due to many factors including:


     prolonged internal rotation posture of the shoulder

     lack of stability at the elbow

     decreased triceps strength as compared to biceps strength


Use of an elbow extension splint / brace which decreases the ability of the biceps to fully function allows the shoulder to move more freely.


If this is noted in a child, one needs to consider a more permanent solution to wearing an external device such as The Biceps Tendon Lengthening Surgery.


             Peer-Reviewed Publications On The Topic Of Biceps Tendon Lengthening Surgery


Nath RK, Somasundaram C. Biceps Tendon Lengthening Surgery for Failed Serial Casting Patients with Elbow Flexion Contractures following Brachial Plexus Birth Injury, ePlasty, 16:2016.


Nath RK, Somasundaram C. Significant improvement in nerve conduction, arm length and upper extremity function after intraoperative electrical stimulation, neurolysis and biceps tendon lengthening in obstetric brachial plexus patients, Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research, 10:1-6, 2015.



             Email contact@drnathmedical.com for a full copy of any publication authored by Dr. Nath.

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  Dallas, TX—October 23

  New York City—October 26

  Dubai, UAE—October 2

 Los Angeles, CA—November 1

  Raleigh, NC—November 3 (am)

 Chicago, IL—November 3 (pm)

   




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